5th Grade – Hopeless Romantic, confirmed (Hopeless Autistic)

In late 2018, I finally arrived to the litmus test of what would solidify the Hopeless Autistic status from the late 1990s, just a year before the diagnosis was brought to my attention after SHTF.

In a Facebook Messenger thread of school age friend, of which 2 years worth of conversations was actually printed out at 147 pages, for a discovery. Mind you, the only video chat occurred around this time, in late 2018. Millennials really use Facebook for pics and texts.

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The Hopeless Autistic: Downgrading the Importance of “Family Support”

Originally written in June 2018

What drives me over the edge is the ridiculous insanity (that is, repeating the same idea and expecting a different result) is the importance of “Family Support”. This “Family Support” is basically all ‘typicals with a one degree connection to someone with a disability not someone specifically with a disability. They are forced to live in a box entitled Self advocates.

Taking out other disabilities and focusing on what this site has been over 2 years, is the ones who have been living with it for life. Why in the hell should the siblings, and other ‘typical family members be the primary caretaker if when the parents pass on?! Why should they have to be the default caretakers? Why should their lives be succumbed by the other family member with a disability?  What about neighbors, family friends, hell even friends to the person with a disability?

Why should the siblings (if they even have one?) put their live on halt to take care of someone severely autistic or other disabilities?

It’s not fair for ether party.

“Family support” is basically an old brand in New Hampshire that was once known for taking down state institutions but is living a dated quality, now just got all political and bashing political parties instead of fixing issues from geriatric Baby Boomers who’s offspring generation has no plans on coming in and helping, unless they want a nice photo op to help them advance their careers in managing “developmentally disabled” people, two or more degrees from that individual.

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