#LondonderryNH Exposed, Episode 7, Part 2 (“Where Was Steven During the Day?”)

Steven chronicles his depressive teenage years when he started his journey outside the school district. In the mid 1990s, the NH Route 101 was expanding it’s highway, and Steven would ride by the ol Castles of Brentwood, filled of shops. Like Route 66 out west, these stores closed, and by the end of 2001, Seacoast Learning Collaborative (SLC) had completely taken over of all of the vacant leased spaces  of the said location that was also owned by the New England Dragway. Steven exposes the “propherial school” system of New Hampshire Special Education and how it felt more like an inmate facility than a place to straighten students up.

#LondonderryNH Exposed, Episode 7, Part 1 (“Where Was Steven During the Day?”)

Steven chronicles his depressive teenage years when he started his journey outside the school district. In the mid 1990s, the NH Route 101 was expanding it’s highway, and Steven would ride by the ol Castles of Brentwood, filled of shops. Like Route 66 out west, these stores closed, and by the end of 2001, Seacoast Learning Collaborative (SLC) had completely taken over of all of the vacant leased spaces  of the said  location that was also owned by the New England Dragway. Steven exposes the “propherial school” system of New Hampshire Special Education and how it felt more like an inmate facility than a place to straighten students up.

Originally Streamed on February 22nd, 2021

NH’s Generational and Cultural Gap (towards Hopeless Autistics)

I’m somewhat active in the special needs movement (I find the subject more of an overstatement to be honest) in this state. In the last few years as I’ve been more exposed to the insiders and power players, I’ve found out many of these people are aging Baby Boomers who had kids ether in the state’s institution for the developmentally disabled or didn’t and help fight to close it. That institution was the Laconia State School that opened in the turn of the 20th Century and closed in 1991. (for now on, I will refrain from using “LSS” or “Laconia State School” such place in my opinion has escalated to a cliche – especially to the younger generation.)

Which leads to me where I feel there is a disconnect to the special interests groups who have “fought” the system (i.e. being very aggressive  – more aggressive than I can ever be) and won by having the place close down. Meaning a new evil would loom within a couple of years.

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“Just another kid”…till…

in late 1999. As previously stated, I was confronted with the disorder in the end of the 20th Century. The worst timing to be told you’re different, but not only that but a disorder that no one really knew about. Factor diverting out of district to the infamous Seacoast Learning Collaborative (a big proponent of “restraint and seclusion” as well as just zero-tolerance on anything that makes you happy.)

I had some noticeable social quirks, some borderline on the “creepy” level.

But about 80% of me was basically a “normal” as possible of a person. All the pieces I was all became torn apart by professionals who no longer are working with special needs or in a critical level in 2015. They were doing it for their own “social capital” and brown nosing themselves to the top. They didn’t care about the students they were messing up. That would be unprofessional to have any moral duty to protect us.

Meanwhile, as these “professionals” were trained to follow autistics of any ability or inability, by a “spec sheet” as I like to call it, the pages off the DSM IV. And the DSM version at the time was very vague to be quite blunt. One professional would take that definition, and treat me like a retard, or take it another way and say I’m creepy, or that Aspeger’s friend in Lowell has all the dreams in the world since “Only in Massachusetts” can someone whose super high functioning have the dreams they want.

I don’t say I have an acquired brain disorder per se, but I thought like other physically disabled people, they were happy and healthy till something unexpected happened. In my case I found out I was different and struggled whether to be “different” or be like “normal” people. Of course, the back and forth wasted precious time in my teenage years into my twenties.

I still feel like to this day I am very borderline, partially at risk, partially functioning. But I am so in the middle, it’s a crapshoot. I wished this post was a work of fiction.